Believe in supporting the arts?

I do. I believe in supporting the arts. I pay a lot of taxes and the horrible people who decide how to spend them are taking money away from all the things I care about and giving it to rich people and the machinations of war. It kills me. What can I do to support the arts, as a lowly, relatively poor person who has no say over tax expenditures? I like to buy things directly from artists when I can, but what else might I do?

There’s another way. You can provide direct support, monthly, to an individual artist and have an immediate effect. A real effect. No, it doesn’t help elementary school kids get to have art class at school (you can donate supplies, teachers always welcome help!), and it doesn’t do anything to move the system, but by helping an individual artist, you DO support the arts.

Marnie Galloway

My daughter Marnie is such an artist, and has launched her Patreon page seeking patrons. For as little as $3-$5/month, you can contribute in a real way. She is seeking patronage to help “offset the cost of two days of childcare a week to work on two new projects: researching and developing a new graphic novel, and creating a local, site-specific experimental comics project here in Chicago. These are slow, long-term projects that need hours in libraries, hours experimenting with materials, and hours dipping pen nibs in ink that would definitely be disrupted by tiny, curious, banana-covered hands.”

Here is her Patreon page (https://www.patreon.com/marniegalloway) and if it goes to the ‘Posts’ page, just click the ‘Overview’ button to read her pitch. With just a couple of clicks, you can set up a monthly donation of your choice, and she has some lovely rewards to accompany each level of patronage.

Be a Medici. Be a patron of the arts, by which I mean a specific artist. And specifically, by which I mean a beautiful artist named Marnie Galloway:

Marnie Galloway is a cartoonist & illustrator working in Chicago, Illinois. She was born in Austin, Texas and studied philosophy & logic at Smith College. She has previously worked as an offset press apprentice (’08), a letterpress studio assistant (’09-10), an art director at Muse and Cicada magazines (’12-’15), a co-organizer at the Chicago Alternative Comics Expo (’13-’16), and as co-host of the podcast Image Plus Text (’15). These days she divides her time equally between making new books and doing freelance illustration. She lives in a Moomin-esque yellow house with her husband Tom, her newly-toddling son Ilan, and a beastly cat named Al.